• Reports on Child Protection and Economic Strengthening

    Child Protection and Economic Strengthening

    Livelihoods, Economic Strengthening, Child Protection and Well-Being in Western Uganda thumbnail

    Livelihoods, Economic Strengthening, Child Protection and Well-Being in Western Uganda

    This study addresses the relationship between household livelihoods and children‘s well-being and protection in two districts of Western Uganda supported by the Western Uganda Bantwana Initiative (WUBP). The study involves a survey of a total of 246 households with orphans and vulnerable children (OVC).  Sampling allowed comparison of households that had received services with households that had not.   Findings suggest not only the value of economic strengthening activities to support the well-being of children, but also the potential importance of psychosocial support to households in complementing such provision.  
    The Impacts of Economic Strengthening Programs on Children: A Review of the Evidence  thumbnail

    The Impacts of Economic Strengthening Programs on Children: A Review of the Evidence

    This review of 43 impact studies sought to methodically capture the known impacts of economic strengthening (ES) programs (microcredit, skills training, agricultural interventions, etc.) on the well-being of children (0-18 years) in crisis contexts in low-income countries. The review looked at effects on children from interventions engaging caregivers as beneficiaries compared to those targeting children themselves. The goals were to understand the types of approaches taken to economic strengthening that focus on improving children’s welfare, catalog the interventions that have been rigorously evaluated for their impacts on children, and identify gaps in knowledge.  
    What do we know about economic strengthening for family reintegration of separated children? thumbnail

    What do we know about economic strengthening for family reintegration of separated children?

    This report looks back at economic strengthening (ES) approaches used in family reintegration programs to capture lessons learned. It outlines common ES approaches, their advantages and disadvantages; offers case studies of innovative models; and recommends key principles for improved programming, monitoring, and the building of an evidence base.  The report relied on interviews with practitioners and a review of program reports and tools employed in the field.  The report recommends that agencies prioritize building internal capacity to design and implement effective ES programs and that donors and policymakers work to build the ES capacity of the child protection field.  All stakeholders should prioritize building the evidence base through evaluation research, including experimental or longitudinal designs.
    Why Measuring Child-Level Impacts Can Help Achieve Lasting Economic Change thumbnail

    Why Measuring Child-Level Impacts Can Help Achieve Lasting Economic Change

    This paper promotes discussion and advocacy around measuring the impacts of economic strengthening on children in order to improve their well-being and end the cycle of poverty. Economic strengthening aims both to address the short-term needs of poor people and to enable entire communities to overcome poverty and live healthy, productive lives.  Growing evidence links children’s physical and psychological health with their future economic opportunities and potential.  The paper proposes that economic strengthening programs seeking to improve the wellbeing of vulnerable households assess and monitor child-level outcomes and impacts, even when children or youth are not direct program participants. 
    Children and Economic Strengthening Programs: Maximizing Benefits and Minimizing Harm thumbnail

    Children and Economic Strengthening Programs: Maximizing Benefits and Minimizing Harm

    This guide is designed for practitioners designing or implementing economic strengthening (ES) programs in low-income settings that are sensitive to the protection needs and well-being of vulnerable children. The guide provides an overview of key learning about how ES can achieve better outcomes and impacts for children aged 0-18, both within and outside of household care, whether the direct program beneficiaries are adults or adolescents themselves. It provides guidance on mitigating threats to children’s well-being that may be an unintended consequence of ES interventions. Recommendations help practitioners have productive conversations within project teams and across programming sectors.
    Cash and Child Protection thumbnail

    Cash and Child Protection

    This paper examines the links between cash transfers and the positive and negative outcomes for children – in particular, the role cash transfers have played in protecting children from abuse, neglect, exploitation and violence. The paper’s aim is to identify ways in which cash transfer activities could be designed to support the protection of children affected by emergencies.  There is encouraging evidence of the positive impact of cash transfers on children from education, health, poverty and HIV and AIDS programs in developing countries. Many child protection concerns are brought about by poverty and a lack of resources, and this situation is exacerbated in chronic emergency and fragile state contexts. Therefore, cash injections should be a valuable tool for preventing and responding to abuse, neglect, exploitation and violence against children. Staff in all sectors should remain mindful of the potential risks to children from cash transfers, and put in place mechanisms to protect them from harm.
    Child Safeguarding in Cash Transfer Programming thumbnail

    Child Safeguarding in Cash Transfer Programming

    This tool enables humanitarian actors to make cash transfer programming more accountable to children, by giving guidance on how to prevent and respond to child protection incidents more effectively.  With the goals of mitigating the increased risks of cash transfers for beneficiaries, the tool covers the full program cycle from preparation, planning, implementation, and monitoring.