• Women in Nepal

    Global Refugee Youth Consultations

    "We Believe in Youth" GRYC Final Report

     

    Background

    Seldom consulted, frequently overlooked, and often unable to fully participate in decision making, the talents, energy, and potential of Refugee Youth—young people aged 15-24 years old—remain largely untapped. In more than 50 national and sub-national consultations held in 22 countries, participants across regions emphasized that refugee youth want the same things that young people want everywhere: to be consulted, to be listened to, to contribute, to engage, and to be part of solutions. 

    We Believe in Youth details the most pressing challenges refugee youth face and their recommendations on how best to address these challenges. The report is a road map for action for all those engaged in humanitarian response—States, international organizations, international and national civil society organizations, donors, and youth groups.

    Ten Challenges Identified by GRYC participants

    • Difficulties with legal recognition and obtaining personal documents
    • Difficulty in accessing quality learning, education, and skills-building opportunities
    • Discrimination, racism, xenophobia, and "culture clash"
    • Few youth employment and livelihood opportunities
    • Gender inequality, discrimination, exploitation, and violence, including for LGBTI youth
    • Poor access to youth-sensitive healthcare, including psychosocial support
    • Lack of safety, security, and freedom of movement
    • Challenges for unaccompanied youth
    • Lack of opportunities to participate, be engaged, or access decision makers
    • Lack of information about asylum, refugee rights, and available services

     

    Seven Core Actions for Refugee Youth

    • Core Action 1: Empower Refugee Youth through meaningful engagement
    • Core Action 2: Recognize, utilise, and develop Refugee Youth capacities and skills
    • Core Action 3: Ensure Refugee Youth-focused protection
    • Core Action 4: Support Refugee Youth physical and emotional wellbeing
    • Core Action 5: Facilitate Refugee Youth networking and information sharing
    • Core Action 6: Reinforce Refugee Youth as connectors and peace builders
    • Core Action 7: Generate data and evidence of Refugee Youth to promote accountability to youth

    For additional background and resources on GRYC, click here

    Global Refugee Youth Consultations

    Seldom consulted, frequently overlooked, and often unable to fully participate in decision making, the talents, energy, and potential of refugee youth—young people aged 15-24 years old—remain largely untapped. Lead by the Women's Refugee Commission and the UNHCR, the Global Refugee Youth Consultations bring together refugee and host country youth to capture the most pressing challenges refugee youth face and their recommendations on how best to address these challenges.

    In more than 50 national and sub-national consultations held in 22 countries, participants across regions emphasized that refugee youth want the same things that young people want everywhere: to be consulted, to be listened to, to contribute, to engage, and to be part of solutions. The consultations culminated in Seven Core Actions for Refugee Youth which serves as a road map for action for all those engaged in humanitarian response—States, international organizations, international and national civil society organizations, donors, and youth groups.

    An Agent for Peace

    Malual Bol Kiir is a 23 year old South Sudanese refugee now living in Uganda. Kiir is one of three refugee youth being honored at the WRC’s Voices of Courage luncheon on May 4, for their commitment to finding solutions for the global refugee crisis.

    Kiir was forced to flee South Sudan for the first time when he was just 7 years old. “I was in a government boarding school where the teachers had guns to protect the students,” he recalls.

    Advocating for Gender-Based Violence Victims

    Halima Mohamud Mohamed is a 20 year old Somali woman living in the Nakivale refugee settlement in Uganda. She works as a youth ambassador, and helps the most vulnerable in her community, especially survivors of gender-based violence (GBV). For her work, Mohamed is being honored, along with two other youth refugees, at the WRC’s Voices of Courage Awards Luncheon on May 4.