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  • Women in Nepal

    Migrant Rights and Justice

    Halfway Home: Executive Summary

    Thousands of children migrate to the United States each year. Many of these children come fleeing war, violence, abuse or natural disaster; others come to reunite with family members already here, or to seek better lives for themselves. They undertake difficult journeys, often across numerous international borders, and often alone.

    Refugee Policy Adrift: The United States and Dominican Republic Deny Haitians Protection

    Interviews with Haitian women who spent months in U.S. detention before they eventually were denied asylum and repatriated to Haiti.

    Earning Money/Staying Safe: The Links Between Making a Living and Sexual Violence for Refugee ...

    Second in a series of three reports looking at the intersection between refugee women's livelihoods strategies and their vulnerability to gender-based violence.

    Desperate Lives: Burmese Refugee Women Struggle to Make a Living in Malaysia

    First in a series of three reports looking at the intersection between refugee women's livelihoods strategies and their vulnerability to gender-based violence.

    "We Want to Work": Providing Livelihood Opportunities for Refugees in Thailand

    A delegation team traveled to Thailand from June 22 to July 3,2006, to assess current livelihood programs targeting refugee women and youth and to learn about emerging opportunities due to lifting of some Thai government restrictions on the ability of refugees to participate in livelihood activities.

    GBV Livelihoods

    On 27th January 2010 the Permanent Mission of the Principality of Liechtenstein hosted a panel discussion with the Women’s Refugee Commission on: The Link between Livelihoods and Genderbased Violence in Displacement Settings.

    Desperate lives: urban refugee women in Malaysia and Egypt

    The future of displacement is clearly urban – and clearly fraught with challenges. The Women’s Refugee Commission (WRC) has recently undertaken research into the risks and challenges confronting refugee women in urban areas – as well as the opportunities they gain – as they seek to provide for themselves and their families in settings where international assistance is minimal.

    Parental Rights Executive Summary

    Five million children in the U.S. have at least one undocumented parent and three million of these children are U.S. citizens. Immigrant parents who are detained or deported risk losing their U.S. citizen children. This executive summary of our report Torn Apart by Immigration Enforcement: Parental Rights and Immigration Detention outlines this loss of parental rights and contains recommendations to remedy the situation.

    Separados por el Servicio de Inmigración: Los derechos de los Padres y La Detención por Cuestiones M

    Aproximadamente al menos un padre de unos 5,5 millonesde niños en los Estados Unidos está indocumentado. Tres millones de estos son ciudadanos estadounidenses. Estos niños ocupan un lugar único dentro de la ley de inmigraciónfederal porque las actividades de cumplimiento de inmigraciónen contra de sus padres pueden tener un efecto particularmente dramático y desproporcionado sobre ellos.De acuerdo con un informe del Departamento de Seguridad Nacional de Estados Unidos (DHS, Department of Homeland Security), Oficina del Inspector General, más de108.000 padres extranjeros de niños ciudadanos norteamericanos fueron expulsados de los Estados Unidos entre1998 y 2007. La deportación fuerza a cientos de padres atomar decisiones con movedoras sobre qué hacer con sus hijos. Sin embargo, para algunas familias no existe ninguna opción al respecto. Los arrestos, detenciones y deportaciones de inmigración pueden provocar una compleja serie dehechos que socava la capacidad de los padres de tomar decisiones sobre el cuidado de sus hijos, complican la reagrupación familiar y, en ciertas circunstancias, pueden llevara la finalización de los derechos de los padres.

    Forced From Home: Executive Summary

    Increased Migration of Unaccompanied Children to the United States 

    Beginning as early as October 2011, an unprecedented increase in the number of unaccompanied alien children (UACs) from the Central American countries of Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras began migrating to the United States. During the first six months of fiscal year 2012, U.S. immigration agents apprehended almost double the number of children apprehended in previous years. The Department of Health and Human Service’s (HHS) Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR), the agency tasked with the care and custody of these children, had a record number of 10,005 in its care by April 2012. 

    Economic Empowerment of Urban Refugee Youth: Guiding Principles

    In many countries in the Global South, rapid urbanization is giving rise to normalized daily violence and low-level armed conflict in densely populated slums. A sizeable minority of the people coping with these conditions are refugees aged 15-25. The urban context presents unique barriers to the economic success of displaced young women and men, but also some significant advantages.

    The Women's Refugee Commission has developed these guiding principles for building an enabling environment for urban refugee youth livelihoods, based on research in Cairo, Nairobi and Panama City.

    Detained or Deported? Parental Toolkit (English, Print)

    This toolkit provides detained and deported immigrant and undocumented mothers and fathers with crucial information they need to protect and maintain parental rights and make well-informed, critical decisions regarding the care and welfare of their children. It includes information on how to get a lawyer, how to stay in touch with children, and how to participate in family court or child welfare hearings.

    The toolkit also provides officials, attorneys, service providers and family members who work with detained parents and their children with critical information to ensure that family unity and children’s best interests are taken into consideration in immigration decisions.

    If you would like to print this toolkit, click here.

    Me han Detendo o Deportado: Que Pasara con mis hijos o hijas? (Parental Rights Toolkit | Spanish, Print)

    This toolkit provides detained and deported immigrant and undocumented mothers and fathers with crucial information they need to protect and maintain parental rights and make well-informed, critical decisions regarding the care and welfare of their children. It includes information on how to get a lawyer, how to stay in touch with children, and how to participate in family court or child welfare hearings.

    The toolkit also provides officials, attorneys, service providers and family members who work with detained parents and their children with critical information to ensure that family unity and children’s best interests are taken into consideration in immigration decisions.

    [Spanish-language Version of "Detained or Deported? Parental Toolkit"]

    Detenida o Deportada? Una Guia Breve Para Mantener La Custodia de Sus Hijos

    [Spanish-Lanugage Version of "Detained or Deported? Short Guide to Maintaining Custody of Your Children"]